November

November Monthly TBR

Well hello there, November. I’d say nice to see you but you know… that would kind of be a lie. Because you mean that winter is just around the corner and ugh.

October wasn’t too bad! I read about 17 books, 8 of which were not comics/graphic novels, but that’s still a lot of reading considering my limited time. I already know that November is going to be busy at work, and then full of holiday stuff, so picking a lot of non-fiction for my November TBR probably wasn’t the best idea, but it couldn’t be helped…

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From the top down:

  • Seconds by Bryan Lee O’Malley – I think this graphic novel is something about a girl using magical mushrooms to change things in her life for the better? I don’t know, it’s gotten a lot of great recs lately and it’s by the author that did Scott Pilgrim, if that means anything to you.
  • In Real Life by Cory Doctorow and Jen Wang – This graphic novel is something about a girl who plays a massive multiplayer online game and befriends someone else… I  don’t know, it sounds good.
  • Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future by A.S. King – Something YA about girls who can start to see future events and it’s all very bad and women’s rights have gone down the drain. I like books with feminist-y messages, so sure, why not. BookRiot has been singing praises for this book and it’s got me curious.
  • Heaven’s Queen (Paradox #3) by Rachel Bach – Seriously, this is such a fun space sci-fi series. I’ve been flying through it. It kicks ass. Per the blurb on the cover, Felicia Day agrees.
  • Gilead by Marilynne Robinson – I actually had this in my readathon pile last month, but I never got around to it. I still really would like to get it read this year though. It’s been on my TBR for about a decade. That’s not even an exaggeration, I remember seeing it on my shelf when I used to work at a bookstore and wanting to read it then. Le sigh.
  • How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson – Because it sounds interesting. I think the innovations are things as think of as pretty simple, like ice and accurate clocks. I might snag this one of Audible to listen to as well.
  • Dataclysm: Who We Are When We Think No One’s Looking by Christian Rudder – This sounds FASCINATING. Basically, it’s a look at how all of the data that major social networking sites (Facebook, dating sites, Google, etc) can be used to see how people REALLY behave, versus how they SAY they behave.
  • The Birth of the Pill by Jonathan Eig – I am SO damn excited to read this book. From what I’ve heard, it focuses on the four people who made modern birth control possible, from the scientist who struggled to create a drug that could prevent pregnancy to the Catholic who used his own influence in the Church to make it an acceptable concept within our culture. As someone who is thankful literally every single day for her birth control, I really can’t wait to dive into this.
  • Astonishing X-Men Collection #2 by Joss Whedon and John Cassaday – Finishing out this fantastic run! Hmmm… now what X-Men stuff to read next?
  • Reinventing Comics by Scott McCloud – Yes, another comic about comics! I really enjoyed McCloud’s Understanding Comics, and this was sitting on the shelf at the library, soooo.

On the Kindle: 

  • Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel – I’m actually already reading this. It takes place 20 years after a super flu wipes out like 90% of humanity, and it’s about a girl who’s part of a travelling group of actors and musicians.
  • Grave Mercy (His Fair Assassin #1) by Robin LaFevers – I this was one of the very first Kindle books I downloaded, and I still haven’t read it. And I keep hearing about how this is such a great fantasy YA series. So okay.
  • Adulthood Rites (Xenogenesis #2) by Octavia Butler – Because Octavia Butler. Although I forgot to bring this to the front of my Kindle, but it’s there.

More comics:

  • Rat Queens #9 by Kurtis J. Wiebe and Roc Upchurch – Should come out mid-to-end November. I mean, I probably don’t even have to list this here. You can safely assume that I am devouring each monthly issue as it comes. But I love it so much it has to be mentioned.
  • Locke & Key: Omega (volume 6) by Joe Hill and Gabriel Rodridguez – It was such a mistake to get the first five from the library and not the last one… getting my hands on this ASAP.

Audiobooks:

  • Yes, Please by Amy Poehler – Well come on, this was clearly what my Audible credit for this month was going to be spent on.

Yeah, it’s a lot. As usual. And several big books of non-fiction. *shrugs*

What’s on your TBR in these upcoming weeks?

~Sarah

November Mini-Review Recap

Well, November wasn’t half-bad!

liz lemon gif

I read 9 books, which considering the time of the year and the job change (last time I’m going to mention the job change, I promise), is kind of good! I mean sure, some were short or graphic novels, but they still count! Let’s get to the tiny thoughts.

Hyperbole and a Half

Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh – Part humor, part memoir, this book was a hysterical joyride to read. Some deeper parts that talk about depression, which were also well done. I highly recommend this as a Christmas gift!!

The Deaths of Tao

The Deaths of Tao by Wesley Chu – This is the sequel to The Lives of Tao, and it was intense, action-packed, and left me begging Angry Robot for a third book.

The Gates

The Gates by John ConnollyThe Gates is a quirky book about a young boy trying to save the world when the Large Hadron Collider accidentally opens up a portal linking Hell to our realm. I love it when science and the supernatural are combined!

Same Difference by Derek Kirk Kim – A graphic novel about young people connecting, but it was kind of short and obscure for my tastes. I never got around to reviewing it because I didn’t have much to say.

The Republic of Thieves

The Republic of Thieves by Scott Lynch – This is the third and latest book in the Gentleman Bastards series and good lord, I love these characters. I sooooooo can’t wait for the fourth book!

Lexicon

Lexicon by Max Barry – An action-packed thriller centered on the idea that words can have complete power over a person, if you know how to use them. If this doesn’t sound fascinating to you, I don’t even know what we’re doing here.

Ade

Ade by Rebecca Walker – A short, powerful love story.

The Rosie Project

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion - I listened to this on audio and it was such a delight that I immediately bought myself the hardcover, and I’m itching to re-read it. It is smart, funny, and made me grin like an idiot! Loved it.

the ace of skulls

The Ace of Skulls by Chris Wooding – This is the fourth and last book in the Tales of the Ketty Jay series, and I’m so sad it’s over! But this was a really fantastic conclusion to the series, and it’s going to remain a favorite series of mine.

So that was my November! And the year is almost over… holy crap! So have you read any of these? Thoughts?

~Sarah

November Poll starts now! Come vote ya’ll!

Hey there peeps. So it’s that time again, time for you to pick what you want me to read and review in November. Book descriptions are from Goodreads.com, and the poll will end Halloween night (Oct. 31)! Here’s your options…

The romance pick.

 Splendid by Julia Quinn:

American heiress Emma Dunster has always been fun–loving and independent with no wish to settle into marriage. She plans to enjoy her Season in London in more unconventional ways than husband–hunting. But this time Emma’s high–jinks lead her into dangerous temptation…

Alexander Ridgely, the Duke of Ashbourne, is a notorious rake who carefully avoids the risk of love…until he plants one reckless kiss on the sensuous lips of this high–spirited innocent…and condemns himself to delicious torment. Little does he know that his passion has touched the very soul of the lovely enchantress…and committed them both to a lifetime of splendid ecstasy.

The popular fiction pick.

 A Visit from the Good Squad by Jennifer Egan:

Bennie is an aging former punk rocker and record executive. Sasha is the passionate, troubled young woman he employs. Here Jennifer Egan brilliantly reveals their pasts, along with the inner lives of a host of other characters whose paths intersect with theirs. With music pulsing on every page, A Visit from the Goon Squad is a startling, exhilarating novel of self-destruction and redemption.

 

The YA pick.

Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys:

Lina is just like any other fifteen-year-old Lithuanian girl in 1941. She paints, she draws, she gets crushes on boys. Until one night when Soviet officers barge into her home, tearing her family from the comfortable life they’ve known. Separated from her father, forced onto a crowded and dirty train car, Lina, her mother, and her young brother slowly make their way north, crossing the Arctic Circle, to a work camp in the coldest reaches of Siberia. Here they are forced, under Stalin’s orders, to dig for beets and fight for their lives under the cruelest of conditions.

Lina finds solace in her art, meticulously – and at great risk – documenting events by drawing, hoping these messages will make their way to her father’s prison camp to let him know they are still alive. It is a long and harrowing journey, spanning years and covering 6,500 miles, but it is through incredible strength, love, and hope that Lina ultimately survives. Between Shades of Gray is a novel that will steal your breath and capture your heart.

The foodie pick.

My Life in France by Julia Child:

When she arrived in France, she was a gawky, six-foot-two, wide-eyed girl from Pasadena, unable to cook; or, for that matter, speak French. Despite this inauspicious beginning, 32-year-old Julia Child was to transform herself into a Gallic cooking genius. In this memoir, completed after her 2004 death by her grandnephew, Child reminisces about her culinary training, her life in France, and her beloved husband, Paul.

The other popular fiction pick.

Domestic Violets by Matthew Norman:

Tom Violet always thought that by the time he turned thirty-five, he’d have everything going for him. Fame. Fortune. A beautiful wife. A satisfying career as a successful novelist. A happy dog to greet him at the end of the day.

The reality, though, is far different. He’s got a wife, but their problems are bigger than he can even imagine. And he’s written a novel, but the manuscript he’s slaved over for years is currently hidden in his desk drawer while his father, an actual famous writer, just won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His career, such that it is, involves mind-numbing corporate buzzwords, his pretentious archnemesis Gregory, and a hopeless, completely inappropriate crush on his favorite coworker. Oh . . . and his dog, according to the vet, is suffering from acute anxiety.

Tom’s life is crushing his soul, but he’s decided to do something about it. (Really.) Domestic Violets is the brilliant and beguiling story of a man finally taking control of his own happiness—even if it means making a complete idiot of himself along the way.

 

Soooo there we have it! Can’t wait to see what you guys pick! Ready….. Set….. VOTE!!!

~Sarah