#HamAlong – Post Eight (THE LAST ONE!)

On the one hand – I can’t believe we did it! And by that I mean I can’t believe I did it, because man this is a long-ass book. But on the other hand – it was a really good book, and I was reading it with the most awesome people, so thank Alice and everyone else so much. Now let’s wrap this up, shall we?

  • This section starts off with Hamilton being pretty damn depressed – convinced that Β “this American world was not made for me” and still going on about how immigrants are going to ruin the county, and writing to Eliza about how the world is full of evil. Someone just give Hamilton a hug and make him stop being ridiculous, please.
  • Hamilton was planning a big collaborative publishing effort to surpass The Federalist, and man it sounded good. I am kind of sad that that book 200+ years ago did not get written.
  • Hamilton takes on the case People vs. Croswell, basically because he loved big constitutional battles that would allow him to give 6-hour long speeches. And he didn’t charge a fee, because this is his idea of fun.
  • Aaron Burr “had been openly accused of every conceivable sin: deflowering virgins, breaking up marriages through adultery, forcing women into prostitution, accepting bribes, fornicating with slaves, looting the estates of legal client.”

Jesus Christ Kid

  • Sooooo… really, was Hamilton your biggest shit-talking problem? Come on now, buddy.
  • Both Burr and Hamilton kept their upcoming duel from their loved ones, which is just kind of ridiculous. Like I get it, but man Eliza would’ve said this whole mess straight.
  • And also, Hamilton did not handle their financial situation. He kind of talked himself into thinking that he was leaving his family better off than he actually was.
  • Historians are kind of divided on whether or not Hamilton threw away his shot. Chernow seems to think so. And it’s Hamilton, so he probably did. Dude loved to make a dramatic point.
  • Hamilton takes a while to die, and meanwhile everyone is just shocked and heartbroken and sad and I maybe teared up a bit.

  • Burr never shows too much remorse for killing A. Ham, but does spend a lot of time avoiding the states where he’d be most likely to get arrested for it. He makes St. Simon’s Island a place to lie low, which is notable only because I was on that very island last summer when I went to Georgia for my little sister’s graduation and I had no idea.
  • Jefferson starts to show a little more favor to Burr after the duel, because Jefferson is just determined to try to be the biggest ass.
  • A. Ham’s kids grow up and Eliza continues on, like a boss, but she grievesΒ big time. This just tore me apart – “I have remarked to you that I have had a double share of blessings and I must now look forward to grief … For such a husband, his spirit is in heaven and his form in the earth and I am nowhere any part of him is.”

I can’t believe it’s over! I’m excited to read things that are not Hamilton, but also kind of sad that it’s over. I guess now my only goal is to somehow someway go see the damn play. Oh and visit A. Ham’s tombstone, which may happen next weekend since there’s a like 60% chance I’m going to NYC to see my mom for her birthday.

Major thanks again to Alice for being a wonderful HamAlong hostess and for all of you that joined in. Best of women, indeed.

bow

~Sarah

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3 comments

  1. “he loved big constitutional battles that would allow him to give 6-hour long speeches. And he didn’t charge a fee, because this is his idea of fun.” Hamilton, you super nerd.

    TEARING UP WHEN HAMILTON WAS DYING IS TOTALLY ACCEPTABLE and I maaaaay have done so on the train. Dammit, with the emotions

    We did it!! Raise a glass to freeeeedom (and also us finishing this book)

    Like

  2. Burr was just kind of a jerk and I really want to sit down and talk to Lin-Manuel Miranda about how he redeemed him and made him a really likable villain.

    I feel like we will all read so many books now! Think of all the reading hours we have open to us!

    Like

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