The Rebirths of Tao by Wesley Chu

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I’m so sad to see this series come to an end, but man it was a great ride. If you haven’t read it yet, do yourself a favor and drive to your nearest bookstore and pick-up The Lives of Tao and The Deaths of Tao AND the newest, The Rebirths of Tao. I’m sure you’re thinking you should just get the first one and see how you like it before you get the others. Save yourself the time and just buy them all. In fact, I hope you feel really lucky that you can get them all at once because I read them all as they were released and oh man, the wait sucked.

And now, if you haven’t read the first two, you should probably go away and do that because I’m going to say things that will spoil those two books for you a bit.

It’s been about 11 years since the events of the last book. I KNOW, that’s a jump, but it’s a good thing. The war between the Prophus and the Genjix is still going on, with the added difficulty of human interference thanks to “the Great Betrayal” that occurred at the end of the second book. It seems like the extinction of humanity and the Quasing is just around the corner, and the Tan family is at the center of it. Roen and Jill are still active Prophus agents, but also trying to raise their teenage son, Cameron. When the Genjix hit them at home and they’re all forced to split up and flee, it’s an action-packed ride full of hopes that they’ll get together as a family and  somehow keep mankind alive.

As always, the Quasing-host interactions are brilliant. The book bounces between several POVs, including that of the enemy’s, but it never gets confusing. Roen is still a great character – to think of the bum he was in the beginning of book one, to the awesome agent / husband / father he is now – it’s such a big change, but still the same guy. Still a smart ass with a good heart, and I love that.

Happily, this is a great end to the series. It’s concrete and doesn’t really leave any loose ends, but somehow also manages to leave just enough open in case Chu ever decides to continue on. This is probably one of the best books I read of the year so far, and the whole Tao Trilogy has a prized spot on my shelf, just waiting to be re-read.

Sarah Says: 5 stars

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