Classics Club August Question

What up, Classics Clubbers?

Alrighty, so the August question o’ the month! Here it is:

“Do you read forewords/notes that precede many classics?  Does it help you or hurt you in your enjoyment/understanding of the work?”

Well, sometimes. It depends on my mood really, but in general I usually skip the foreward or introduction in the beginning. More often than not, I’m too excited to actually start the story, and I also worry about spoilers. The times that I have read the foreward first, I can’t really remember if it helped or hindered, so I guess it didn’t much matter to me.

Thinking about this actually makes me wonder why they put these things at the start of the book – I feel like readers would get more out of them at the end of the book, after reading the story. That said, I hardly ever actually go back to the beginning to read the foreward. I only do that when I REALLY loved the book and I’m not quite ready to let it go yet.

*shrugs*

What about you guys? Do you read the forewards? Do they have value, or is it just a way for publishers to make their copy of that classic a little different from the others out there, since they usually have different people doing the introductions?

~Sarah

 

 

 

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6 comments

  1. I usually read the forward when I’m done with the book. There are some good ones that have given me insight into the author/book. I get all cranky about spoilers so I definitely don’t read them first. 😉

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    1. Once in a while I’ll read the forward if I want to give myself an idea of what I’m getting into. I read the Preface to Breakfast of Champions today and that helped give me an idea of Vonnegut’s mind frame, but since it was written by him there were no spoilers 🙂

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  2. I never read the forwards! I know someone has put time and effort into it, but when I’m tackling a classic, it makes me feel accomplished to have those pages behind me before I even start. I know, I’m ridiculous.

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