Armchair BEA! Day 4: Ethics & Non-Fiction

What up, book nerds? Ready for another day of Armchair BEA? I didn’t do a post yesterday (partly because I was at work and couldn’t use the computer because I was training someone, ugh) but I did attempt to participate in the Twitter chat from my phone, and that… didn’t go great. Joining in chats is just way too hard without access to tweetchat! I think there’s another one later today (right?) and I should be home for that one, so that should go better.

ANYHOO, enough of my babbling. The topics today are pretty cool – Blogger Ethics, and for the genre discussion, Non-Fiction. That’s some semi-heavy stuff right there! Let’s do this.

Blogger Ethics

Am I the only one who feels like I’m about to write an essay about ethics? It’s such a serious-face topic.

So here’s the deal – don’t be an ass. Don’t plagiarize or steal someone else’s images, ideas, or words. Whenever you can, link back to people. It’s good karma. It’s RIGHT. I haven’t had any specific issues with someone stealing my stuff yet, and I hope I never do. I see the blogosphere freak the eff out every once in a while when a blogger gets caught plagiarizing and it’s like… why? Why don’t you write your own stuff? How can you be that crappy? I always try to give credit where credit is due. And if I don’t, it’s most likely because I forgot or couldn’t find the original source and if someone pointed it out to me I’d correct it ASAP, but I can’t even think of a situation in which this would arise. I even use my own pictures of books for reviews now.

It may not sound very intellectual or anything, but that’s my general outlook on blogger ethics and guidelines – don’t be an ass, and you’ll be all right.

Non-Fiction

Do you guys even know how happy this genre topic makes me happy?

SO HAPPY.

SO HAPPY.

2013 has been the year of non-fiction for me so far, particularly science-ish topics. I just can’t seem to get enough.

The prompt suggests that we recommend some non-fiction to someone who’s never read non-fiction before. Okay well that’s pretty much impossible – at the very least, you’ve read textbooks, and probably memoirs or something! Or cookbooks! Etcetera. But basically, just think of ANY topic you’re interested in – famous people, history, cooking, knitting, true crime, space, gardening, travel, sports, you get the picture – and there is a non-fiction book out there about that topic, just waiting for you! Browse your local library or bookstore, or type keywords of internet into Amazon or something.

And let’s face it – we could all use some more non-fiction in our lives, right? Exercise your brain, and whatnot.

Now, here are some of my favorite non-fiction reads!

Thoughts on any of these? What are your favorite non-fiction books? Give me some recommendations! I’ll read practically anything.

~Sarah

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23 comments

  1. How was the Chelsea Handler book? The only nonfiction I’ve read lately that I can recommend is The Gut and Psychology Syndrome book. It’s all about eating clean for people with stomach issues or things like autism/dyslexia. I love that you read so much nonfiction and such a wide range of topics. I want to get into it more, but don’t really know where to start. Maybe I’ll dig out some old college textbooks lol.

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    1. The Chelsea Handler books are so fun! The only one I haven’t read yet is Chelsea Chelsea Bang Bang, and I’m going to try to correct that soon.

      Really, there’s SO many different non-fiction topics that I’m sure you’ll find something that interests you. Personally, I think browsing around the bookstore is the funnest way to find non-fic that looks good, but also the most expensive b/c then I want to buy ALL the books!

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  2. There are so many amazing nonfiction books out there. Michio Kaku is pretty great, like you mentioned; I also love Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell, as well as his Tipping Point. Most recently, I stumbled across this book called The New Geography of Jobs by Enrico Moretti. It is so fascinating that I’ve nearly been harassing my boyfriend, my best friend, my mom, and my brother to read it so I can discuss it with them already!!! Goodness.

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  3. Ohhh you totally could have used a Wil Wheaton DBAD gif (http://ow.ly/lzmbG) in the ethics section. LOL! (“Don’t be an ass” reminded me of it)

    I mentioned A.J. Jacobs Year of Living Biblically in my non-fiction post. Loved that! I haven’t read Drop Dead Healthy yet, though. Need to go add that to Mt. TBR. 🙂 Great post!

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  4. I love your post! 😀 And yeah, ‘don’t be an ass’ is a pretty good rule to go by. I don’t get why people would plagiarize either, you can’t really be proud of that right? Or feel justified when it gives you better stats?
    I really want to be more of a non-fiction reader, but my brain refuses to be exercised by these kind of reads and mostly just shuts down when I try…

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    1. Yeah… I KIND of understand having some weird sort of pressure that people feel that leads them to plagiarizing… but like you said, you couldn’t feel proud of your stats or anything because the work wasn’t yours, so just write your own stuff. And if you’re that pressured and stressed, maybe just don’t post or blog? I don’t know. People are strange.

      Daisy you might really enjoy one of those funny-lady memoirs that have been so popular lately – Tina Fey, Mindy Kaling, Chelsea Handler, Jane Lynch… they’re non-fiction but kind of breezy and good for a laugh!

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      1. I’m still talkin about the book. Films rarely do books justice. And in this case, I found the film quite hollow. Not in anyway as helpful or empowering as the book. Which I still found funny. But then maybe that’s my sense of (black) humour…!!

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  5. Don’t be an ass! That’s a great motto and really it’s the only rule to follow. 🙂

    I can’t get enough of nonfiction either. It’s my true love. TRUE LOVE!

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    1. We REALLY do lash out when someone plagiarizes. There was a lot of drama a year or two ago because a really popular blogger was caught doing it. I don’t think I did a whole post or anything condemning her, but I did stop taking part in her memes and whatnot.

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  6. Why does ethical behavior have to be so hard for some people? Are they really that desperate to plaigirize? I’ve been enjoying non-fiction as well this year. The only one I’ve read off your list is Eat, Pray, Love. While I can say, I loved the Eat and Pray sections, by the time she got to Love I wasn’t feeling it. Ethics is such a tough but important issue. I always worry that I am doing something wrong inadvertently. Thanks for letting me know Here are my thoughts on ethics and the non-fiction I’ve read recently. Hope you will stop by. Happy Friday and keep up the good work from your friendly ABEA cheerleader today!

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    1. I think that the end of the Eat Pray Love was the weakest. I LOVED hearing about Bali, it sounds amazing there… but I didn’t like what happened while she was there (trying to avoid comment spoilers, lol).

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  7. Hadn’t heard about the dinosaur book. Thanks! Also enjoyed your plain talk about ethics. While it’s not illegal to “steal” an idea, it’s certainly not nice and if you’re following the form and structure of the idea as executed then we definitely have a problem. Great topics today. I’m a real nonfiction fan. Enjoyed my visit.

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