>New Poll! Come vote!

>OK ladies & gents, it’s time for the March poll. Vote for the one you want to see me read / review here on my blog in March. There are 6 choices listed below, with a little synopsis for each one (I got the summaries from http://www.goodreads.com.) The poll is on the right near the top.

Voting ends the night of February 28th. Here we go!

The Dispossessed by Ursula K. le Guin – the sci-fi pick
Shevek, a brilliant physicist, decides to take action. He will seek answers, question the unquestionable, and attempt to tear down the walls of hatred that have isolated his planet of anarchists from the rest of the civilized universe. To do this dangerous task will mean giving up his family and possibly his life. Shevek must make the unprecedented journey to the utopian mother planet, Urras, to challenge the complex structures of life and living, and ignite the fires of change.

Zeitoun by Dave Eggers the non-fiction pick
Abdulrahman and Kathy Zeitoun run a house-painting business in New Orleans. In August of 2005, as Hurricane Katrina approaches, Kathy evacuates with their four young children, leaving Zeitoun to watch over the business. In the days following the storm he travels the city by canoe, feeding abandoned animals and helping elderly neighbors. Then, on September 6th, police officers armed with M-16s arrest Zeitoun in his home. Told with eloquence and compassion, Zeitoun is a riveting account of one family’s unthinkable struggle with forces beyond wind and water.

The Jane Austen Book Club by Karen Joy Fowler – the chick lit pick
In California s central valley, five women and one man join to discuss Jane Austen s novels. Over the six months they get together, marriages are tested, affairs begin, unsuitable arrangements become suitable, and love happens. With her eye for the frailties of human behaviour and her ear for the absurdities of social intercourse, Karen Joy Fowler has never been wittier nor her characters more appealing. The result is a delicious dissection of modern relationships.

My Antonia by Willa Cather – the classics pick
The story of Antonia Shimerda is told by on of the friends of her childhood, Jim Burden, an orphaned boy from Virginia. Though he leaves the prairie, Jim never forgets the Bohemian girl who so profoundly influenced his life. An immigrant child of immigrant parents, Antonia’s girlhood is spent working to help her parents wrest a living from the untamed land. Though in later years she suffers betrayal and desertion, through all the hardships of her life she preserves a valor of spirit that no hardship can daunt or break.When Jim Burden sees her again after many years he finds her “”a rich mine of life”,” a figure who has turned adversity into a particular kind of triumph in the true spirit of the pioneer.

The Weird Sisters by Eleanor Brown – the modern lit pick
The three Andreas sisters grew up in the cloistered household dominated by their Shakespearean professor father, a prominent, eccentric academic whose reverence for the Bard left its imprint on his daughters’ names: Rosalind (As You Like It), Bianca (The Taming of the Shrew), and Cordelia (King Lear). The siblings eventually left home and escaped their ponderous monikers with nicknames, but their mother’s medical maladies brings them back. Before long, their unwelcome reunion reveals that they all have problems: Rose is force-feeding a troubled relationship; Bean is entangled in a big city case of embezzlement; and unmarried Cordy is pregnant. Eleanor Brown’s first fiction has justly won praise as “thought-provoking… poignant… sparkling and devourable.”

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak – the YA pick
It’s just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. . . .
Narrated by Death, Markus Zusak’s groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a young foster girl living outside of Munich in Nazi Germany. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she discovers something she can’t resist- books. Soon she is stealing books from Nazi book-burnings, the mayor’s wife’s library, wherever they are to be found.
With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, Liesel learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids, as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement.

Can’t wait to see which ya’ll choose! Also, I know the font color on the poll is dark – I can’t find an option to change it like all of my other side-bar stuff. Sorry it’s so hard to see – if you highlight it with your cursor you can read it easier.

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2 comments

  1. >Okay so I totally voted for one I'd be interested in hearing your take on but that I probably won't ever read. Cuz I want you to wait on those until I can read them with you!

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